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13 June 2014

Heather Varieties to Try

Following on from my previous article concerning growing heathers, there are details below of some varieties which you might consider growing, though you may have to order them from specialist nurseries. Except where stated they are suitable for acid to neutral soil.

Erica carnea f. alba 'Ice Princess' is a dwarf spreading evergreen shrub 15cm in height, with bright green foliage and erect racemes of white flowers in winter and early spring. Ultimate height 0.1-0.5 metres, ultimate spread 0.1-0.5 metres, time to ultimate height 2-5 years.

Erica darleyensis 'J.W. Porter' a spreading dwarf evergreen shrub to 25cm in height, with the young foliage tipped red in spring. Flowers mauve-pink, not always freely borne, in late winter and early spring. Ultimate height 0.1-0.5 metres, ultimate spread 0.1-0.5 metres. Time to ultimate height 5-10 years.

Calluna vulgaris 'Darkness' is a compact, low-growing evergreen shrub to 25cm in height, with dark green foliage and short racemes of crimson flowers. Ultimate height 0.1-0.5 metres, ultimate spread 0.1-0.5 metres. Time to ultimate height 5-10 years. Requires acid soil.

Erica carnea f. alba 'Isabell' this is a spreading heather with erect shoots to 15cm in height. It has bright green foliage and racemes of white flowers in late winter and early spring. Ultimate height 0.1-0.5 metres, ultimate spread 0.1-0.5 metres. Time to ultimate height 2-5 years.

Erica cinerea 'C.D. Eason' is a dwarf, spreading evergreen shrub to 25cm in height, with dark green foliage and short racemes of magenta-pink flowers from early summer to autumn. Ultimate height 0.1-0.5 metres, ultimate spread 0.1-0.5 metres. Time to ultimate height 5-10 years.

Calluna vulgaris 'Wickwar Flame' is a compact, spreading evergreen shrub, with yellow and orange foliage in summer, coppery-red and orange in winter. Flowers mauve-pink, in short spikes. Ultimate height 0.1-0.5 metres, ultimate spread 0.5-1 metres. Time to ultimate height 5-10 years. Acid soil required.

Erica carnea f. alba 'Golden Starlet' is a low-growing evergreen shrub to 20cm in height, forming a wide mat of bright yellow foliage becoming yellow-green in winter. Flowers white, in short racemes. Ultimate height 0.1-0.5 metres, ultimate spread 0.1-0.5 metres. Time to ultimate height 2-5 years.

Erica darleyensis 'Ghost Hills' this is a vigorous spreading dwarf evergreen shrub making a wide mat of bright green foliage, tipped cream in spring. Flowers purple, darker near the tip, in late winter and early spring. Ultimate height 0.1-0.5 metres, ultimate spread 0.5-1 metres. Time to ultimate height 5-10 years.

Erica carnea f. aureifolia 'Foxhollow' is a prostrate evergreen shrub to 25cm in height, with yellow-green young foliage, becoming reddish-yellow in winter. Flowers pale pink, in short racemes, from late winter. Ultimate height 0.1-0.5 metres, ultimate spread 0.1-0.5 metres. Time to ultimate height 5-10 years.

Calluna vulgaris 'Tib' is a compact evergreen shrub with dark green foliage and double, deep pink flowers in short spikes in spring. Ultimate height 0.1-0.5 metres, ultimate spread 0.1-0.5 metres. Time to ultimate height 5-10 years. Requires acid soil.

When you are ordering, remember that heathers tend to look best in groups rather than planted singly.

 







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